Starry Night by Vincent Van Gogh

This Legacy 3D Fine Art Print is printed on a premium aluminum substrate. The print ships flat and unframed. Shipping additional. The Starry Night is an oil on canvas by the Dutch post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh. Painted in June, 1889, it depicts the view from the east-facing window of his asylum room at Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, just before sunrise, with the addition of an idealized village. It has been in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City since 1941, acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest. It is regarded as among Van Gogh's finest works, and one of the most recognized monuments in the history of Western culture.

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Woman with a Parasol by Claude Monet

With Manet's assistance, Monet found lodging in suburban Argenteuil in late 1871, a move that initiated one of the most fertile phases of his career. Impressionism evolved in the late 1860s from a desire to create full–scale, multi–figure depictions of ordinary people in casual outdoor situations. At its purest, impressionism was attuned to landscape painting, a subject Monet favored. In Woman with a Parasol – Madame Monet and Her Son, his skill as a figure painter is equally evident. Contrary to the artificial conventions of academic portraiture, Monet delineated the features of his sitters as freely as their surroundings. The spontaneity and naturalness of the resulting image were praised when it appeared in the second impressionist exhibition in 1876. Woman with a Parasol was painted outdoors, probably in a single session of several hours' duration. The artist intended the work to convey the feeling of a casual family outing rather than a formal portrait, and used pose and placement to suggest that his wife and son interrupted their stroll while he captured their likenesses. The brevity of the moment portrayed here is conveyed by a repertory of animated brushstrokes of vibrant color, hallmarks of the style Monet was instrumental in forming. Bright sunlight shines from behind Camille to whiten the top of her parasol and the flowing cloth at her back, while colored reflections from the wildflowers below touch her front with yellow.

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A Young Scholar and his Tutor by Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

An elderly man in a subdued green velvet cloak trimmed in fur instructs a boy wearing a lavish Eastern costume. The artist presents a study in contrasts: the student's youthfulness, his smooth complexion, lavish garments, and quest for knowledge are balanced against the learned man's aged, weathered face as he imparts wisdom. A warm light that accentuates the tonal contrasts and rich textures of the velvet and satin fabrics bathes the two figures. Light catches and shimmers off the precious stones of the boy's gold jewelry. Fine, precise brushstrokes enhance the overall impression of softness. The subjects are presented in the guise of historical personages, possibly portraying the youthful Old Testament prophet Samuel with his instructor Eli. The use of lavish costumes and light and dark contrasts reveal the influence of Rembrandt.

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Ogden Utah Temple (color) by Credit: Masterpiece Images

The Ogden Utah Temple (formerly the Ogden Temple) is the sixteenth constructed and fourteenth operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Located in Ogden, Utah, it was originally built with a modern, single-spire design very similar to the Provo Utah Temple. During a renovation completed in 2014, the exterior and interior were extensively changed.

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Ogden Temple (sepia) by Credit: Masterpiece Images

The Ogden Utah Temple (formerly the Ogden Temple) is the sixteenth constructed and fourteenth operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Located in Ogden, Utah, it was originally built with a modern, single-spire design very similar to the Provo Utah Temple. During a renovation completed in 2014, the exterior and interior were extensively changed.

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Payson Utah Temple

The Payson Utah Temple is a temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) under construction in Payson, Utah. The temple was announced on January 25, 2010, by church president Thomas S. Monson. The temple will be the southernmost along Utah's Wasatch Front, and will be the 15th completed temple in the state, with the Provo City Center (under construction) and Cedar City (announced) temples bringing the total to 17 when they are completed. The temple will be located near the intersection of 930 West and 1550 South in Payson on previously undeveloped land. Additional details, such as the temple's planned size, were not available at the time of the announcement. Dallin H. Oaks presided at the groundbreaking ceremony on October 8, 2011, with William R. Walker conducting and Steven E. Snow, Jay E. Jensen and Janette Hales Beckham in attendance. The temple, at 96,630 square feet on a 15 acre lot, will be one of the largest built in recent years. A public open house is scheduled from Friday, 24 April 2015, through Saturday, 23 May 2015, excluding Sundays. The temple will be formally dedicated on Sunday, June 7, 2015.

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Irises by Vincent Van Gogh

In May 1889, after episodes of self-mutilation and hospitalization, Vincent van Gogh chose to enter an asylum in Saint-Rémy, France. There, in the last year before his death, he created almost 130 paintings. Within the first week, he began Irises, working from nature in the asylum's garden. The cropped composition, divided into broad areas of vivid color with monumental irises overflowing its borders, was probably influenced by the decorative patterning of Japanese woodblock prints. There are no known drawings for this painting; Van Gogh himself considered it a study. His brother Theo quickly recognized its quality and submitted it to the Salon des Indépendants in September 1889, writing Vincent of the exhibition: "[It] strikes the eye from afar. It is a beautiful study full of air and life." Each one of Van Gogh's irises is unique. He carefully studied their movements and shapes to create a variety of curved silhouettes bounded by wavy, twisting, and curling lines. The painting's first owner, French art critic Octave Mirbeau, one of Van Gogh's earliest supporters, wrote: "How well he has understood the exquisite nature of flowers!"

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Wheat stacks, Snow Effect, Morning, 1891 by Claude Monet

In the fall of 1890, Impressionist Claude Monet arranged to have the wheatstacks near his home left out over the winter. By the following summer he had painted them at least thirty times, at different times throughout the seasons. Wheatstacks was Monet's first series and the first in which he concentrated on a single subject, differentiating pictures only by color, touch, composition, and lighting and weather conditions. He said, "For me a landscape hardly exists at all as a landscape, because its appearance is constantly changing; but it lives by virtue of its surroundings, the air and the light which vary continually." After beginning outdoors, Monet reworked each painting in his studio to create the color harmonies that unify each canvas. The pinks in the sky echo the snow's reflections, and the blues of the wheatstacks' shadows are found in the wintry light shining on the stacks, in the houses' roofs, and in the snowy earth. With raised, broken brushstrokes, Monet captured nuances of light and created a solid, geometric structure that prevents the surface from simply melting into blobs. The wheatstacks are solid forms, and, while the outlying houses are indecipherable close-up, they are clear from a distance.

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Still Life with Flowers and Fruit, 1869 by Claude Monet

Although painted in his studio, this still life shows the influence of the outdoor experiments that Claude Monet undertook in the summer and fall of 1869, while he was living at Bougival on the Seine River. His exercises in different painting techniques are seen in the way he softened the outlines of forms and the manner in which he explored the descriptive possibilities of brushstrokes: broad and flat in the tablecloth, sketchy in the apples, and short and dense in the flower petals. Monet's technique is also apparent in the use of light to animate the surfaces of the flowers, fruit, and tablecloth and in the way the colors are affected by the light, by reflections, and by each other. These pictorial innovations became the foundation for the development of the Impressionist technique in the decades that followed.

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Corner of the Garden, Alcazar, Sevilla, 1910 by Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida

In this view of the garden at Seville's Alcázar Palace, Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida concentrated on the geometry of form and the clear, bright sunlight of southern Spain instead of the changing reflections of light. He had returned to Seville in 1910 to create a second series of paintings, four paintings of townscapes and garden scenes, following the series he had painted in 1908. While he retained the brilliance and atmosphere of his earlier paintings, he seems to have approached this second series in a less fanciful manner.

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